Clodagh's Irish Food Trails Tour 8 Days

Clodagh's Irish Food Trails Tour 8 Days

7 Night Tour From $1,137 pps

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This tour arrives into and departs from Dublin, but can be customised to include Shannon as an arrival/departure point.

Attractions on This Tour

Dublin City

Dublin, the capital city of Ireland is an exciting blend of the old and new. You can walk in the footsteps of Wilde in Georgian Dublin, pass by the windmill studios where U2 lay down their world famous tracks and stand in the place where President Barack Obama in 2011 uttered those famous words in the tongue of his ancestors - Is feidir linn – Yes we can!

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Dublin City

Dublin Hop On Hop Off Bus Tour, Dublin City

The Dublin Tour has been carefully designed to give you the freedom to explore and experience the history and culture of Dublin at your leisure. You will get the opportunity to visit all the main Dublin attractions along the route and these include Dublin Zoo, St Patrick’s cathedral and Trinity College (home of the Book of Kells).

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Dublin Hop On Hop Off Bus Tour, Dublin City

Temple Bar, Dublin City

Temple Bar is located on Dublin’s south-side and lies between the Bank of Ireland (opposite Trinity College) and Christchurch. Unlike the majority of Dublin city, it has maintained it’s medieval street pattern, complete with cobbled, narrow streets.

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Temple Bar, Dublin City

Guinness Storehouse, Dublin City

At Guinness Storehouse you’ll discover all there is to know about the world’s most famous beer. A dramatic story that begins 250 years ago and ends…where else - in the Gravity® bar with a complimentary pint of the black stuff.

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Guinness Storehouse, Dublin City

Kilkenny City, County Kilkenny

Kilkenny is a popular tourist town on the east coast of Ireland. The highlight of the town is Kilkenny Castle which is a 12th century castle. Other important stops are St. Canice's Cathedral and the Smithwicks Brewery.

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Kilkenny City, County Kilkenny

Kilkenny Castle, Kilkenny City

The magnificent Kilkenny Castle overlooks the River Nore and has guarded this important river crossing for more than nine hundred years. The castle gardens around Kilkenny Castle, with extensive woodland paths, rose garden and ornamental lake, are well worth a visit. A 12th Century castle, remodeled in Victorian times and set in extensive parkland, which was the principal seat of the Butler family.

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Kilkenny Castle, Kilkenny City

Rock of Cashel, County Tipperary

The Rock of Cashel (Carraig Phádraig), more formally known as St. Patrick’s Rock is reputedly the site where a conversation ensued between Aenghus-King of Munster and St. Patrick in the 5th Century AD.

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Rock of Cashel, County Tipperary

Jameson Experience, Cork City

Follow the old distillery trail through mills, maltings, stillhouse, warehouses and kilns - some of these buildings date back to 1795. Unique within Ireland and Britain, you can also see the fully operational water wheel and large grain stores.

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Jameson Experience, Cork City

Cork City, County Cork

In the 7th century St. Finbarr founded a monastery on marshy land and so laid the foundations stones of Cork City – the name deriving from the Gaelic – corach meaning marshy place. Over the subsequent centuries, it survived the arrival of the Vikings, Normans and English and today it is Ireland’s second largest city (after Dublin)

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Cork City, County Cork

English Market

Situated in the very heart of lively Cork City the English Market opened in 1788 in the style of the covered markets found in many English cities of the day – and it has been trading ever since!

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English Market

Kinsale, County Cork

Kinsale is a small harbour town in West Cork located just 18 miles outside of Cork City. The town was originally a medieval fishing port and in more recent times has become renowned for its gourmet food, picturesque views and golf.

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Kinsale, County Cork

Kenmare, County Kerry

Kenmare is known for its’ breath taking scenery and wonderful hospitality. Located at the head of Kenmare Bay this small town has only a population of 1800 but becomes much busier during the summer months.

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Kenmare, County Kerry

Killarney, County Kerry

Killarney is the perfect gateway to explore all that Kerry has to offer. During the summer months the town is very busy as people explore the Ring of Kerry, Killarney National Park and many other attractions.

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Killarney, County Kerry

Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry

The Dingle Peninsula (or Corca Dhuibhne in Gaelic) is one of the most remote regions in Ireland. It’s staggering natural beauty and intriguing history has inspired a plethora of poets, singers and musicians and brought thousands of visitors to the region to see what so many speak of. The Dingle Peninsula lies in Ireland’s southwest and stretches some 48 kilometres - dominated by mountains and steep cliffs, intermittently broken by sandy beaches The famous Blasket Islands so eloquently written of by Peig Sayers lie to the western side of the peninsula. One of it’s most westerly villages Dún Chaoin is often jokingly referred to as "the next parish to America"

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Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry

Gallarus Oratory, County Kerry

The Gallarus Oratory, a small, stone built chapel in the shape of an up-turned boat is one of the most famous landmarks on the Dingle Peninsula. The Oratory is built of stone without mortar, using “corbel vaulting”, a technique developed by Neolithic tomb-makers. The Oratory is a national monument in the care of the Office of Public Works and may be viewed free of charge.

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Gallarus Oratory, County Kerry

Slea Head, Dingle Peninsula

Slea Head (Irish: Ceann Sléibhe) is a promontory in the westernmost part of the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry and a well known and recognised landmark as well as a very scenic viewpoint: "The views seem to go on and on, getting better as you travel ahead. The sights are hard to describe, rustic and unchanged for centuries."

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Slea Head, Dingle Peninsula

Bunratty Castle and Folk Park, County Clare

At Ireland’s premier visitor attraction you are invited to explore three wonderful experiences – the acclaimed 15th Century Bunratty Castle, the 19th century Bunratty Folk Park and the Village Street. The Castle is the most complete and authentic medieval fortress in Ireland. Built in 1425 it was restored in 1954 to its former medieval splendour and now contains mainly 15th and 16th century furnishings, tapestries, and works of art which capture the mood of those times. Today, the castle stands peacefully in delightful grounds.

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Bunratty Castle and Folk Park, County Clare

Burren Region, County Clare

The Burren, from the Gaelic word Boireann is an area of limestone rock covering imposing majestic mountains, and tranquil valleys with gently meandering streams. With its innate sense of spiritual peace, extraordinary array of flora and wildlife, and megalithic tombs and monuments older than Egypt's pyramids, the Burren creates a tapestry of colour and a seductively magical aura which few people leave without wanting to experience again.

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Burren Region, County Clare

Burren Smokehouse, County Clare

The Burren Smokehouse Visitors Centre was established in 1995, to create a window for the smokehouse own products and other local gourmet products and crafts. It has become a popular tourist attraction in the North County Clare area and welcomes over 30,000 visitors from all over the world each year. Visit the Burren Smokehouse Visitor Centre and get a tasting of the Burren smoked salmon. You can discover mosaics inside and outside the shop, and look at the first kiln that was used when the Burren Smokehouse was first set up.

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Burren Smokehouse, County Clare

Cliffs of Moher, County Clare

The Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's top Visitor attractions in County Clare. The Cliffs are 214m high at the highest point and range for 8 kilometres over the Atlantic Ocean on the western seaboard of Clare. O'Brien's Tower stands proudly on a headland of the majestic Cliffs. From the Cliffs one can see the Aran Islands, Galway Bay, as well as The Twelve Pins, the Maum Turk Mountains in Connemara and Loop Head to the South.

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Cliffs of Moher, County Clare

Galway City, County Galway

Galway is Ireland's 4th largest city and a hugely popular tourist destination for both Irish and international visitors. The city is vibrant with festivals and events constantly on. There is also a lot cultural interest with literary ties to a number of Ireland's great writers. The local people are incredibly friendly and will help ensure a stop here will never be forgotten.

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Galway City, County Galway

Clifden, County Galway

Clifden, nestled amidst breathtaking mountain scenery and beautiful rugged coastline is one of Ireland's most loved towns. Located in the West of of the county, Clifden is the largest town in Connemara, which of course is an outstanding jewel in Ireland's scenic crown. Below you’ll find information on some of the attractions in this beautiful area.

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Clifden, County Galway

Connemara Region, County Galway

Connemara (in Irish: Conamara), which derives from Conmhaicne Mara (meaning: descendants of Con Mhac, of the sea), is a district in the west of Ireland comprising of a broad peninsula between Killary Harbour and Kilkieran Bay in the west of County Galway or south west Connacht. The Conmhaicne Mara were a branch of the Conmhaicne, an early tribal grouping that had a number of branches located in different parts of Connacht.

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Connemara Region, County Galway

Kylemore Abbey, County Galway

Known as Ireland’s most romantic Castle, Kylemore Abbey, located in Connemara, Co. Galway is the No.1 tourist attraction in the West of Ireland. Perfect for a family day out and easily accessible from Galway or Mayo, Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden offers visitors scenic photographic opportunities as well as woodland walks, garden tours, fascinating history, beautiful architecture, ample shopping in the craft shop and tempting homemade delights in the restaurant and tea rooms.

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Kylemore Abbey, County Galway

Connemara National Park, County Galway

Connemara National Park is situated in the west of Ireland in County Galway and covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park’s mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range which are a dominant feature of the Connemara countryside.

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Connemara National Park, County Galway

Killary Fjord, County Galway

Killary Harbour/An Caoláire Rua is a fjord located in the West of Ireland in the heart of Connemara which forms a natural border between counties Galway and Mayo. It is 16 km (9.94 mi) long and in the centre over 45 m (148 ft.) deep. It is one of three glacial fjords that exist in Ireland, the others being Lough Swilly and Carlingford Lough.

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Killary Fjord, County Galway

Clonmacnoise, County Offaly

Clonmacnoise (pronounced in Irish: Cluain Mhic Nois, “meadow of the sons of Nos”) is a monastic site overlooking the River Shannon in County Offaly. The extensive ruins include a cathedral, castle, round tower, numerous churches, two important high crosses, and a large collection of early Christian grave slabs (the last two on display in the excellent site museum).

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Clonmacnoise, County Offaly

Kilbeggan Distillery Experience, County Westmeath

The Kilbeggan Distillery Experience is the last remaining example of a small pot still whiskey distillery in Ireland. It was licensed in 1757 and whiskey production continued for 200 years until 1957, when the distillery closed its doors. In 1982, the local people began restoring the old distillery and today it is open to the public as a Museum.

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Kilbeggan Distillery Experience, County Westmeath

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